CHIS WISE Portfolio Spring 2012

3 May

Blog 1

Blog

Blog 3

Blog 4

Blog Revision

Research Paper

Annotated Bibliography

Annotated Bibliography Revision

Paper Proposal

Paper Proposal Revision

Reflective Essay

Extra Credit

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Civil Rights Movement and Apartheid Compare and Contrast

2 May

Marcelena Stephens

CHIS 202 Wise 10:00

Dr. Underwood

Blog #3

Civil Rights and Apartheid comparison

The Civil Rights Movement happened in the 1950s. The Civil rights movement was a movement in which African Americans fought for full rights as a citizen of the United States of America. The African Americans were denied of any right that White Americans had in the 1950s. They fought for the right to attend the same schools for education, the right to drink from the same water fountains and eat at the same restaurants, and most of all voting rights. The United States Constitutions grant these rights to African Americans by stating so in the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments.  Civil rights ended about 1968.

Apartheid started in the 1940s. Africans not only suffered through struggles of racial issues in the United States of America, they also faced the same issues in their native country of South Africa. The Apartheid Movement that happened in South Africa was very similar to the Civil Rights Movement in the U.S. Apartheid means the separateness by racial factors. This event took place in the 1930s and was also used as a political slogan for the Afrikaner National Party.  Apartheid was basically a system of legal segregation by race. Racial laws that were set in place closely interfered with how African conducted their lives. These racial laws even interfered with laws as such as marriage between Africans and whites. The only purpose of apartheid was to separate all races from each other.  Apartheid finally ended about year 1994.

The differences between  the two movements which were Apartheid and the Civil Rights Movement is that with Civil Rights people were fighting for voting rights, and fighting for citizenship equality. On the other hand, in South Africa, Africans had no voice and were not given a voice at all. They had no one to stand up and fight for them to get positive results. The Apartheid had so many unruly rules that Africans could not get around them no matter what they tried to do. But as for Civil Rights eventually Blacks were heard and started seeing results because of their actions.

Although Civil Rights and Apartheid appear to be very much alike, they indeed are very different. Civil Rights mainly deals with voting rights and citizenship equality and Apartheid dealt with legal separation by whatever race you were. They both had a common purpose in which blacks fought for what they deserved. The two movements are still being dealt with in today’s and probably will never stop until more citizens of today’s society take a stand.

Pan-Africanism Revised

2 May

Marcelena Stephens

CHIS 202 Wise 202 10:00

Dr. Underwood

Blog #4-Revised

 

Pan Africanism

 

The Pan-Africanism movement, founded around 1900, was to secure equal rights, self-government, independence, and unity for all African peoples. Pan-Africanism includes matters as such as leadership, political views, and the issue of nationalism. Each category was often divided by bitter circumstances as such as race and culture. Inspired by Marcus Garvey, he used his speaking ability to encouraged self-awareness among Africans by encouraging them to study of their history and culture.

From the late 1780s into later years free blacks developed their own churches and social meeting places in response to racial segregation. They grew weary and tired of being treated unequal to everyone else. Africans hoped and prayed daily for a revolution to take place in order to gain independence. These religious gathering places helped to foster a sense of collective identity among the people.

Marcus Garvey who is also known as the father of Pan Africanism also founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA). This organization was established in Jamaica by Garvey. It became a major international organization after Garvey moved to the United States 1916. Marcus Garvey used his speaking ability to capture the attention of many working class and poor African Americans in Harlem New York. He developed a newspaper entitled “The Negro World”. This newspaper was widely read by supporters UNIA.  In the reader document number 38 “Marcus Garvey and the Politics of Revitalization” Marcus Garvey explains his view on Pan-Africanism.  One reason Pan-Africanism spread so quickly was because of colonization by European powers. Africa was not promised independence right away but instead took it upon themselves to coordinate an action plan and policy to work toward self-government and interracialism. The actual intergovernmental movement of Pan-Africanism began in 1958 with the First Conference of Independent African States in Accra, Ghana. Ghana and Liberia were the only two countries represented.  Thereafter independence was finally gained. Independence was achieved by more African states in 1960.

The whole idea of Pan-Africanism the Garvey wanted to display was racial pride and unity. He wanted to better the race and realized that it all started with unity. Pan-Africanism not only focused on culture but also focused on politics, ideology in order to pursue a common ground of unity of the history and destiny of Africans.

Pan-Africanism

2 May

Marcelena Stephens

CHIS 202 Wise 202 10:00

Dr. Underwood

Blog #4

 

Pan Africanism

The Pan-Africanism movement, founded around 1900, was to secure equal rights, self-government, independence, and unity for all African peoples. Inspired by Marcus Garvey, he used his speaking ability to encouraged self-awareness among Africans by encouraging them to study of their history and culture.

Marcus Garvey who is also known as the father of Pan Africanism also founded the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA). This organization was established in Jamaica by Garvey. It became a major international organization after Garvey moved to the United States 1916. Marcus Garvey used his speaking ability to capture the attention of many working class and poor African Americans in Harlem New York. He developed a newspaper entitled “The Negro World”. This newspaper was widely read by supporters UNIA.  In the reader document number 38 “Marcus Garvey and the Politics of Revitalization” Marcus Garvey explains his view on Pan-Africanism.

The whole idea of Pan-Africanism the Garvey wanted to display was racial pride and unity. He wanted to better the race and realized that it all started with unity. Pan-Africanism not only focused on culture but also focused on politics, ideology in order to pursue a common ground of unity of the history and destiny of Africans.

American Imperialism

2 May

Marcelena Stephens

CHIS 202 Wise 202 10:00

Dr. Underwood

Blog #2

American Imperialism

The US certainly became an imperialist nation in the 20th century. The American Empire was huge.  Towards the ending of the 19th century the United States finally realized that they had enough potential to be the world’s leading power.

The United States was the leading producer of the crops wheat and cotton. With these crops they developed as a strong industrial nation. The leaders of the United States saw no reason that they should not try to expand and become the leading imperial power, and it was necessary for them to begin immediately before Europe had complete colonial control over the world. In the document “America’s Big Stick” Theodore Roosevelt uses the phrase “Speak softly and carry a big stick” to represent his interest in maintaining his intervention in Latin America. Roosevelt was such a supporter of U.S. imperialism he also enlisted the army during the Spanish-American War and fighting in Cuba. With an ever expanding economy, the United States was looking to build trading posts around the world so they could take advantage of the wealth of other nations so that it would make the United States’ empire larger. In the 1890’s, it seemed silly for the United States officially decided to change and take their place as one of the world powers.

Although isolationism which is the separation from other countries affairs seemed like a good idea for a while, as America quickly grew into an industrial and urban nation. Many people of the American society felt that the county desperately needed to build overseas bases to increase trade and industry. America had the potential to become one of the great powers of the world, but they had to break out of their isolated shell in order to gain power as an imperialist country. The people supported this decision because they believed in the manifest destiny doctrine of the United States, the need to bring democracy to all and to expand its territory. Many Americans considered themselves to be superior to other countries. Because of this, they felt totally obligated to help other countries. As a result of these feelings, the United States got involved in conflicts that they had no part in, but they also made sure that they gained what they were looking for to achieve. At the turn of the 20th century, America had naval bases throughout the Pacific and Caribbean and was considered to be one of the strongest nations in the world.

The Industrial Revolution

2 May

Marcelena Stephens

CHIS Wise 202 10:00

Dr. Underwood

Blog #1

Industrial Revolution

The Industrial Revolution that took place in the 18th century caused many families despair. These times were hard because the English were trying to increase production from their factories to industrialize. The industrial revolution included poverty, and famine. They were troubled by lack of rights and a low paying job while they worked long strenuous hours daily to support their family. During this time people had no choice but to endure situations simply so that their families could stay fed, housed and clothed.

During this time even young children were placed into factories to work. They were assigned to duties that adults were not capable of doing, such as fitting into small machines to complete a task. These things were very dangerous and endangered the lives of many children. Because small children were being put in danger, this sparked anger in parents and became a reason the revolution came about. Another reason for the revolution was the unhealthy toxins that came from the factory machinery. Every person that resided anywhere near them was breathing its toxins and it caused many health problems, but most of the health problems arose especially to those working inside of them. These health problems also led to higher mortality rates because people would become ill but couldn’t afford to lose pay or let alone go to the doctor. Times were beyond rough and with these inventions only becoming greater; this was only a start of a new life to come.

Annotated Bibliography-Revised

2 May

Marcelena Stephens

Dr. Underwood

CHIS 202 Wise 10:00

Annotated Bibliography-Revised

 

 

Annotated Bibliography

Dubois, Ellen C. Women’s Suffrage and Women’s Rights. New York: New York UP, 1947. Print.

  • This source will guide me to analyze what women went through to gain suffrage of their voting rights. This source includes historical facts and time lines of the women’s rights movement. This source is very much relevant to my topic of women’s suffrage. With timelines and facts provided from this source i can accurately state dates and events of the movement.

 

Fisher, Kelcee. “Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony as Friends.” Americas Library. Web. <http://ww.americaslibrary.gov/aa/stanton/aa_stanton_friends_1.html&gt;.

  • Americas Library provides me with background information on the realationship of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. These two women develped a friendship can collectively became the powerhoue of the women’s suffrage movement.

 

Miller, Grant. “Women’s Suffrage, Political Responsiveness, and Child Survival in American History.” The Quarterly Journal of Economics 123.3 (2008): 1287-327. Web.  Journal

  • This source will provide me with American history the women’s role in politics. The women’s role in politics was a very important factor in the women’s suffrage movement because of the fact that women did not have a say so in any type of political activity.

 

Mitchell, Amy. “Women’s Suffrage.” History.com. Web. <http://www.history.com/topics/the-fight-for-womens-suffrage&gt;.

  • History.com will give me information on notable women as such as Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. These two women were very influential in the suffrage movement. Facts about their lives and accomplishments will be acquired from this website.

 

National American Women’s Suffrage Association. Women’s Suffrage Arguments and Results. New York: Kraus Reprint, 1971. Print.

  • This source will give me incite on The National American Women’s Suffrage Association. This was a prominent group in the Women’s Suffrage Movement in which they strongly advocated for women to gain rights all across the nation. This book also provided me with information on the ratification of the 19th amendment which grated women the right to voting.

 

Young, Louise. “Women‘s Place in American Politics: The Historical Perspective.” The Journal of Politics 38.3 (1976): 295-335. Print. Journal

  • This source will also give me a perspective on the role of women in the political world. It also will give me a perspective on the views of male politicians on women gaining the right to vote.